PROJECT APPLICATION: FUNDED PROJECTS FOR RATED RESEARCHERS

 

Human rights literacy: A quest for meaning[1]

 

Prof Cornelia Roux

Research Focus Area

Faculty of Education Sciences

Potchefstroom Campus

North-West University

South Africa

cornelia.roux@nwu.ac.za

http://www.nwu.ac.za/HREiD

http://www.hrlit.org/[2]

 

THIS PROJECT WAS FUNDED BY THE NRF OF SOUTH AFRICA (2012-2015)

Problem identification

Human rights refer to the inherent and inalienable rights possessed by all humans simply by virtue of being human (English & Stapleton, 1997:1). Human rights education is an important part of creating a sustainable environment for human rights. One can argue that human rights and human rights education are two sides of the same coin and therefore the cornerstones of any developed and developing democratic society. Human rights education was endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 49/184 (23 December 1994). Educators and activists of human rights argue that human dignity is one of the important core principles of human rights. Qureshi, (2004:77) also states that the main aim of human rights was that society should respect human dignity and explore avenues to enhance respect amongst humans. Research has shown (Almqvist, 2005; Litorp, Franck & Almroth, 2008) that ignorance on human rights and the absence of human rights education can impact negatively on a society’s concepts of social justice. Human rights education also became a tool from a Western perspective to promote peace and democratic movements. However, it seems that human rights education is not always taken very seriously in the South African education system. Media and education reports on school violence, violations and the abuse of learners’ human rights (De Wet, 2008) prove the lack of respect for individual and group rights. Teachers’ lack of content and pedagogical knowledge (Simmonds, 2010) also result in superficial content knowledge and perceptions of human rights among learners. The question to be asked is: why is there a lack of rigorous discourses on the philosophical, ontological, and epistemological underpinnings of human rights education in teacher training? Human rights education is not only the dissemination of human rights content (cf. Tibbitts, 2002:162), but as Lohrenscheit, (2002:176) argues, it also involves the “…. knowledge and cognitive skills and the understanding and positive valuing of human rights”. The assessment of skills, knowledge and human rights values (Du Preez, 2008) can only be achieved if human rights literacy exits. This research project wants to explore the ontology of human rights literacy.

 

The overall aim of this research project is to determine the knowledge field of human rights education in teacher education at South African Faculties of Education. From this understanding, the project aims to develop a theoretical and philosophical underpinning for human rights literacy for teacher education and other curricula. The purpose of the study is to “develop a theory on human rights literacy which may contribute to the knowledge field of human rights education for teacher training at South African Faculties of Education”. The exploration of human rights literacy was first indicated as an important underpinning of interreligious teaching-learning discourses (cf. Roux, 2010). According to Roux (2010: 1000), some human rights issues find moral relevance in international declarations and constitutions. However, there are also areas of specific understandings and responses to human rights issues as well as the influences of particularistic views of different cultures, religions and world-views. This however does not explain or justify the abuse of universal human rights. Most Western democratic governments function from a humanist frame of reference (collective or particularist) and this paradigm determine the social construct of a society. The management and treatment of ethnic, cultural and religious diversity indicate the paradigm of thought. Education research (Roux et al) (2004-2009) on intercultural and interreligious dialogue, and (2010-2011) religious and cultural practices, signified human rights violations under the auspices of particular socio-cultural and religious traditions. The absence of a theoretical underpinning and understanding of human rights literacy is a vital component in arguments for or against the two notions on human rights being universal and/or particular (Gearon, 2002; Du Preez, 2008; Roux, 2010).

 

Human rights education can only be effective if the knowledge construct and theoretical underpinning of human rights literacy can be defined. Human rights literacy also reflects the arguments constituting hermeneutic and religious literacy as the underlying principles for human rights literacy (Roux, 2010). This notion however has never been explored further within South African teacher education contexts. Therefore, the main research question is defined as: In what ways can the development of a theory on human rights literacy contribute to the knowledge field of human rights education for teacher training at South African Faculties of Education? A related sub-question is: How can this theory and understanding be used to empower all role players in education and society generally against the violations of human rights?

 

References

Almqvist, J. 2005. Human Rights Culture and the Rule of Law Cornwall: Oxford Hart Publishing.

De Wet, A. 2008. Research on sexual harassment of girls in secondary schools in SA. Report for UNESCO; North West University (Potchefstroom campus)

Du Preez, P. 2008. Dialogue as facilitation strategy: Infusing the classroom with a culture of Human Rights. Unpublished PhD-Dissertation, Department of Curriculum Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Stellenbosch.

English, K. & Stapleton, A. 1997. Human rights handbook: a practical guide to monitoring human rights. Durban: Juta. 298 p.

Gearon, L. 2002. Human Rights and Religion. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press.

Qureshi, M. 2004. Education and human rights. New Delhi: Anmol Publications. 376 p.

Roux, CD. 2010. Religious literacy and human rights literacy as prerequisite for human rights education. In G. Durka, L. Gearon, M. de Souza & K. Engebretson (eds.) International Handbook for Inter-religious Education (Volume 4). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Roux, CD., Smith, J., Ferguson, R., Du Preez, P., Small, R. & Jarvis, J. 2009. Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue. Research report: South African Netherlands Project on Alternative Developments (SANPAD) 150pp).

Simmonds, SR. 2010. Primary school learners understanding of human rights teaching-learning in classroom practice. MEd-Dissertation: North-West University (Potchefstroom-Campus), South Africa.

Tibbitts, C. 2002. Understanding what we do: emerging models for human rights education. International review of education, 48(3-4):159-171.

 

 

Rationale and motivation

Research in and debates on teaching-learning diversity in education, highlights that teaching-learning will be able to function more positively in an ever-growing and in a less politicised manner, but still within the educational and social construct. Many authors (cf. Runzo et al, 2007; Osler & Starkey, 1996; Gearon, 2002; Davies, 2000; De Tavarnier & J Pollefeyt, 1998) argued for human rights education and its interrelationship with religion, cultures, worldviews and/or citizenship. The applicant’s research projects and outputs on the abovementioned discourses indicate that understanding interreligious and intercultural teaching-learning through the means of human rights education derive from the notion that in diverse social and education environments, a common denominator (human rights) might overcome differences, skewed by previous political dispensations with a history of violating human rights. However, content knowledge alone cannot guarantee the success of such an exercise. Research has also indicated that the development of human rights consciousness can have a positive impact on society. If all the fundamentals, infused in human rights education, can successfully be utilised, a more just society may develop. The problem identified thus far, is that teachers (in-service) and students (pre-service) do not have the knowledge construct to successfully facilitate human rights education (Du Preez, 2008; Simmonds, 2010; Roux, 2010). An investigation to the anthropological aspects of human rights education was explored in a previous international research project (Roux et al, 2009) and outcomes of that report will infuse new identified subject matters. The lack of human rights literacy seemed to be the main impediment. An in-depth research study needs to determine what human rights literacy entails and how it can establish and develop an improved curriculum and teaching-learning approaches. The rationale of this project is therefore to determine through basic and applied research the theoretical foundation of human rights literacy. The research will concentrate on different identified areas that may contribute to the development of the epistemology and ontology of human rights literacy. These areas are (i) gender issues; (ii) human rights values (iii) social justice; (iv) socio-cultural contexts and (v) curriculum development and implementations. Each of these five identified areas is a starting point to construct a theoretical underpinning for human rights literacy. (See Addendum C for the interaction between the 5 different areas).

References

Davies, L. 2000. Citizenship, Education and Human Rights Education: Key concepts and debates London: British Council.

De Tavarnier, J., & Pollefyet, D. 1998. Heeft de traditie van de Mensenrechten toekoms? Leuven: Uitgeverij Acco.

Du Preez, P. 2008. Dialogue as facilitation strategy: Infusing the classroom with a culture of Human Rights. Unpublished PhD-Dissertation, Department of Curriculum Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Stellenbosch.

Gearon, L. 2002. Human Rights and Religion. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press.

Osler, A. & Starkey, H. 2002. Teacher Education and Human Rights. London: David Fulton Publishers.

Roux, CD. 2010. Religious literacy and human rights literacy as prerequisite for human rights education. In G. Durka, L. Gearon, M. de Souza & K. Engebretson (eds.) International Handbook for Inter-religious Education (Volume 4). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Runzo, J., Martin, N. & Sharma, A. (eds.) 2007. Human Rights and Responsibilities in World Religions. Oxford Oneworld Publications.

Simmonds, SR. 2010. Primary school learners understanding of human rights teaching-learning in classroom practice. MEd-Dissertation: North-West University (Potchefstroom-Campus), South Africa.

 

 

Research objectives

The research objectives will be in line with the problem identification and rationale as outlined in the above-mentioned paragraphs. The rhizomatic research paradigm and grounded theory will influence the design and explicit questions put in the empirical research

The following objectives will be proceeding:

  • To explore the historical literature of human rights education in order to conceptualise the ontology and epistemology of human rights literacy;
  • To determine and understand the conceptualisation of human rights literacy by participants in the target group;
  • To assess current curricula and modules in human rights education at selected Faculties of Education in order to construct a data base on human rights content provided to students.
  • To explore and conceptualise through mixed research methodologies the knowledge base of human rights literacy at Faculties of Education;
  • To execute a survey (large scale research) on perceptions and knowledge construct of human rights, human rights education and identified human rights literacy issues.
  • To administer focus group interviews with participants (4th year students) who participate in the large scale survey.
  • To develop a questionnaire from the gathered data and to execute empirical research with selected first to third year students in teacher training programmes.
  • To re-evaluate the gathered data in order to utilise the epistemology and ontology of human rights literacy.
  • To develop a theory on human rights literacy and to contribute to the knowledge field of human rights education for teacher training at South African Faculties of Education.

 

 

 

 

 

Research methodologies / techniques

Research design

A rhizomatic design based on grounded theory

The rhizome as metaphor for postmodern epistemology is the main research design. In order to define this, it is important to elaborate on the rhizome as a metaphor for postmodern knowledge, as opposed to the tree as a modernist model of knowledge (Deleuze & Guattari, [1983] in Lather, 2007). According to Lather (2007:124), “… [r]hizomes are systems with underground stems and aerial roots, whose fruits are tubers and bulbs”. Rhizomes represent a complex nexus with “an open trajectory of loose and resonating aggregates” (Lather, 2007:93). In this sense it defies linear, hierarchical networks that create one-dimensionality in complex human and social knowledge constructs. Instead it suggests a “… journey among intersections, nodes, and regionalizations through a mulitcentered complexity” (Lather, 2007:124).

 

Grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1976; Glaser, 1993) will be utilized (see diagram Addendum A) as part of the rhizomatic research design. The reason is that the researchers will be the primary instruments of data collection. The theory needs to derive from the “grounded data”. The methods used will be designed to collect “rich data” that will influence the direction of the developed theory. This theory needs to emerge from the data itself. Jacelon & O’Dell (2005:4) describes grounded theory is a qualitative research methodology “in which substantive theory is derive through an ongoing process of continually reviewing the data, refining questions and re-evaluating these changes”.

Grounded theory was chosen for two reasons:

  1. Grounded theory seems to optimize the possibilities and outcomes to develop the knowledge construction and knowledge field on human rights literacy. It is also an appropriate design to answer the proposed research question of the project.
  2. Research in the five different identified areas (see rationale) will commence simultaneously. The point of departure is the topic that develops with a historical literature review into the research question and hypothesis feeding into the conceptual framework, which will give structure to the data collection. At this point theory will be generated from the different methodologies. The collaborative researchers’ specialization will enhance the analyses of the collected data and try to improve the outcomes of the research question on knowledge development of human rights literacy especially for teacher training at Faculties of Education.

 

The following methodological processes will also be used in order to collect the research data. These will enhance the re-development and optimizing of theoretical discourses on human rights literacy. A mixed research methodology will be utilised in order to explore different possible methods in obtaining the data and executing the empirical research. Qualitative and quantitative research methodologies will be used. (cf. Merriam, 1998: 2002).

  1. A survey (questionnaires with 4th year teacher education students) as the starting point to determine basic knowledge construction on human rights literacy comprising of the five determined issues. These students will be beginner in-service teachers the following year and this survey can determine these students’ knowledge on the five determinants as well as their knowledge on the concept human rights literacy
  2. Focus group interviews will be conducted with selected groups (used in the survey) at selected Faculties of Education. The reason is to validate the data collected in the survey and to determine possible opportunities and avenues for the next phase of the data collection. This will also strengthen the discourses and re-evaluate the literature and epistemological understanding of human rights literacy thus far.
  3. Analyses of curriculum content and modules on human rights at selected Faculties of Education. This theoretical and literature review will determine the knowledge content used in teacher training at Faculties of Education and validate the content with the data obtained in the survey and the focus group interviews. Research (Du Preez, 2008, Simmonds, 2010; Roux, 2010; Ferguson, 2010) has shown that teachers’ lack of intrinsic knowledge hampers “good and reliable education” on diversity and human rights issues. Content on the five determinants identified will be part of the grounded theory exercise.
  4. Finally, questionnaires will be administered to students (1st 2nd and 3rd year) in teacher education to determine their basic knowledge construction on human rights literacy consisting of the five determined issues. The reason is that these students are part of the existing training programmes and recipients of the curriculum content on human rights education.

 

References

Deleuze, G. & Felix, G. 1983. On The Line. Trans.  by John Johnston. New York: Semiotext(e)

Deleuze, G. & Felix, G. 1987. A Thousand Plateaus. Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Trans. By Brain Massumi. Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press.

Glaser ,BG. & Strauss, AL. 1967. The discovery of grounded theory. Chicago: Aldine.

Glaser, BG. 1993. Examples of Grounded Theory: A reader. Mill Valley: Calif Sociology Press.

Jacelon, CS. & O’Dell, KK. 2005. Case and grounded theory as qualitative research methods. Urologic nursing Volume 23(1)

Lather, P. 2007. Getting Lost. Feminist Efforts toward a Double(d) Science. Albany: State University of New York Press. 215p.

Merriam, S. 1998. Qualitative research and case studies applications in Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Merriam, S. 2002. Qualitative research in Practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

 

 

Work plan / research activities

See attached addendum B on tasks and workplan of researchers involved in the projects and how the different tasks will be executed during the research process.

 

Tasks

The conceptualisation of the framework on theoretical notions and research questions.

The finalising the ethical approval for the research.

The deconstruction of the theoretical framework for traditional and liberal understandings of human rights literacy (epistemology and ontology).

Exploring the power and power relations.

Deconstructing social justice theory and implications for human rights literacy (HRLit).

The reconstruction of a theory and the development of curriculum and explore the implications for theory in HRLit.

The consultation and validation of data.

 

 

Researchers and tertiary institutions involved

Prof Cornelia Roux (NWU) (Socio-cultural contexts + Curricula); Prof Lebo Moletsane (UKZN = Gender + Socio-culture contexts); Prof Andre Keet (UFS) (Social Justice); Dr Thobeka Mda (HSRC = (Gender + Socio-culture contexts); Dr Annamagriet de Wet (NWU) (Post Doc = Gender and Social Justice); Dr Glynis Parker (NWU) (Post Doc= Socio-cultural issues); Dr Petro du Preez (NWU) (Human Rights Values and Curricula); Ms Shan Simmonds (NWU) (Gender = Curricula); Ms Cecile Eloff (NWU) (Gender = Social Justice); Ms Marisa Verster (NWU) (Human Rights Values+ Socio-culture contexts)

Schedule (see Addendum B)

  • Year 1 (2012) Historical literature review Administer Survey; Questionnaires (4th-years); Focus group interviews (4th-years); Lecturers; Questionnaires (1-3 -years); Analysing data; reformulating literature.
  • Students: 1 PhD Student (NWU); 1 PhD student (UKZN); 2 MEd-students.
  • Year 2 (2013) Analysing, theorising and reformulating knowledge development and reformulating the theoretical processes thus far.
  • Year 3 (2014) Final dissemination; Academic journals; Post graduate studies completion. Disseminate the theory and give momentum to this knowledge development through academic discourses. Re-evaluate the progress and dissemination outcomes.

 

Human resource developments

One of the main human resource developments is that postgraduate students and post-doctoral fellows of three universities will work together. They will be part of the development of new knowledge and will contribute to the knowledge field of human rights education. The main aim for human resource development is to create a sustainable knowledge base that will be able to contribute to teacher training at Faculties of Education. It should also enable students to deliver high quality research under the auspices of well renowned researchers. In this regard, two PhD students (one at NWU and the second at UKZN and still to be recruited) will complement the research team. Three Masters students (two at NWU and one at UKZN) will also form part of the team.

 

 

Equity and redress

The main aim of this research is to contribute to new knowledge development. Students from disadvantage environments will be part of the research project and full-time bursaries will be allocated to these students. The excitement of this initiative is the empowering of researchers on different levels of competence and to emphasise interaction and collaboration. Researchers in different fields of research will be empowered to create a new niche in human rights and human rights education. The established Human Rights Education in Diversity (HREiD) initiative http://www.hreid.co.za will enable students to become part of an international network of researchers on human rights education in diversity.

 

 

Collaboration

Collaboration will mainly be between three Faculties of Education NWU (Prof Cornelia Roux) UKZN (Prof Lebo Moletsane), UFS (Prof Andre Keet) and the Human Science Research Council (HSRC) (Dr Thobeka Mda). These researchers are recognise as some of the leaders in their specific fields of interests and for their academic outputs. The three universities (NWU, UKZN and UFS) and the researchers are all acquainted with human rights, human rights education, curriculum development, gender, and equity and socio cultural contexts. Prof Keet is an expert on human rights education; Prof Moletsane holds a chair on rural education at UKZN and has published extensively on gender issues in education. The input of Dr Mda, a researcher of the HSRC, will strengthen the research team and her research experience, academic qualities and knowledge of students in disadvantaged environments and large scale research will enhance the project’s outputs and validity. At the NWU, Dr Petro du Preez (senior lecturer and project leader of one of the SANPAD-projects) has a well established research record on human rights education and curriculum development. She will strengthen the research with her field of specialization and supervision of postgraduate students.

 

Two post-docs (already part of a SANPAD-international project) will also collaborate in this project. Their current research projects indicate that there is a dire need for basic research and theory on discourses regarding human rights literacy. Dr De Wet is an expert on gender issues and Dr Parker’s research contributes to socio-cultural issues; both have experiences of international conferences and they are currently involved in publications regarding their projects.

 

Two junior researchers (Ms Shan Simmonds and Ms Cecile Eloff) will be part of the project. Ms Eloff’s PhD studies will be part of this research project. Post-graduate students will be identified when the project commences in 2012.

 

 

Potential outcomes

The main outcome of this research will be to contribute to the knowledge development of human rights literacy (HRLit) as part of the knowledge construct in this field of study in Education research and human rights. The outcomes will be in accredited articles on the notion of Human Rights Literacy. Attending and disseminating data at conferences and international seminars on Human rights education. A book publication will be part of the dissemination of this research project.

  • Participation in three national conferences e.g.
    • KENTON
    • EASA – Education Association of South Africa
    • SAAHE South African Association of Higher Education
  • Articles in ISI & ISSN international accredited journal
  • Gender and Education
  • Curriculum Inquiry
  • Journal of Curriculum Studies
  • Legal Education
  • Moral Education
  • Social Work Education
  • Education as Change
  • Education Perspectives
  • South African Journal of Education

 

  • Articles in the following national accredited in journals respectively for example
    • South African Journal of Higher Education
  • Supervision for the following postgraduate students in Curriculum Studies, Human rights education, Education Law and Philosophy in Education

 

  • 2 PhD-students (North West University and University of Kwa-Zulu Natal).
  • 3 MEd (two at North West University and one University of Kwa-Zulu Natal)
  • Students are not identified at UFS

 

Progress to date

This proposal is related to complement as well as support ongoing research projects. The first project was a previous successful SANPAD project (2004–2008) on Establishing a culture of human rights through intercultural and interreligious dialogue across different social and cultural settings in school education (24 academic publications and five post-graduate students were delivered). The second SANPAD project 2009-2012 Human rights education in diversity: Empowering girls in rural and metropolitan school environments indicate that there are huge gaps between the teacher training programmes and the activities in schools and communities. It became clear that there is a lack of knowledge on the essence of human rights education as well as human rights literacy. Since 2010 seven accredited publications have been published and four PhD and 2 MEd students enrolled in the SANPAD-project. Another UNESCO–report (De Wet, 2007) on Sexual harassment of girls in secondary schools in South Africa, indicated that sexual harassment in different forms, is a form of gender violence. The lack of social skills easily leads to sexual harassment or violent behaviour. De Wet (2008:74) stated that women in many SA communities are without power and this imbalance causes in-equality in schools and society. (See CV’s of researchers on NRF-online). This intended project will be a further drive to strengthen this research terrain in the SA and international contexts

 

Reference

De Wet, A. 2008. Research on sexual harassment of girls in secondary schools in SA. Report for UNESCO; North West University (Potchefstroom campus)

 

Outputs

Post-graduate students:

PhD

Ms Janet Jarvis. Registered 2010 and proposal approved in April 2010.

Title: Female teacher’s religious and cultural identities and gender equality in classroom practice.

Ms Lucia Atoyebi. Registered 2010 and proposal approved September 2010.

Title: Human rights education and values of the girl-child: A Kenyan case study.

Ms Shan Simmonds. Registered 2010 and proposal approved September 2010.

Title: Gender equity as a human rights value for girls: Implications for teaching-learning in ethnically diverse classrooms.

Ms Anne Becker. Registered 2010 and proposal approved July 2010.

Title: Curriculum and intra-dialogic spaces: consciousness and becoming in identity construction based on human rights values.

MEd

Ms Mercy Kutu Registered 2010 and proposal approved July 2010.

Title: Integration, progression and infusion in the Intermediate Phase Life Orientation curriculum: Feminist perspectives.

 

2010 Conferences:

International conferences

Cornelia Roux (NWU):

2009      Introduction on the SA history of Human rights education – its values and failures. Finnish Balkan Initiative (FBI) University of Tarto, Estonia, 24-27 September.

2010      Religious and Cultural traditions and Human Rights Education: Are we listening to the voices? Democracy Human Rights and Social Justice in a new Global dispensation- Challenges and Transformations ÖREBRO-UNISA International Conference 2010 UNISA South Africa, 1-3 February.

2010      Freedom of religion and belief and religious space: interreligious education and tourism education. International Seminar on Religious Education and Values. (ISREV), Ottowa, Canada, 25– 31 July.

 

Petro du Preez (NWU):

2010 Morality, human rights and freedom of religion and belief in     Religion Education. International Seminar for Religious Education and Values. (ISREV) Ottawa, Canada, 25-31 July

 

Hyacinth Skervin (NWU):

2010 Cultural Sites of Meaning: Challenges and Pitfalls for Gender-Based Research. Democracy Human Rights and Social Justice in a new Global dispensation- Challenges and Transformations ÖREBRO-UNISA International Conference 2010 UNISA South Africa, 1-3 February.

 

Shan Simmonds (NWU):

2010      Challenges of human rights in teaching-and-learning and curriculum development: two perspectives. Őrebro-UNISA International Conference: Democracy, human rights and social justice in a new global dispensation – challenges and transformations. Pretoria, South Africa, 1-3 February. (co-authored by Petro du Preez)

2010      Learners’ perceptions of human rights in shaping their understanding of freedom of religion and belief. International Seminar on Religious Education and Values (ISREV). Ottowa, Canada, 25-30 July.

 

National conferences

Cornelia Roux (NWU):

2009      Human rights, culture and discipline: Through the eyes of teachers. Symposium: Positive Discipline in Education. UNISA (February) Co-presenter P du Preez

 

Janet Jarvis (UKZN):

2010   Religion Education: The religious identity of student teachers. 4th Annual Teaching and Learning Conference. UKZN (September)

 

Shan Simmonds (NWU):

2010      Divergent value systems meet convergent moral dilemmas: Implications for teaching-and-learning in religion in education. WISER. In the presence of faith: An interdisciplinary symposium on Southern African studies of religion. University of Johannesburg. (24-26 February).

2010      Giving girls a voice: Contradicting viewpoints of girls cultural and religious practices in their communities. 3rd Research Colloquium: Education for Social Justice. University of the Free State, Bloemfontein. (29-30 September) (co-author P du Preez).

 

 

Articles Published and Submitted

Cornelia Roux (NWU):

2009      Religion Education as praxis: Voices and Narratives on teaching and learning experiences. Alternation (3)112-137.

2009      Religion in Education: Who is responsible? Alternation (3)3-30.

2010      Human Rights values or Cultural values? Perusing values to maintain discipline in multicultural schools (co-author P du Preez) South African Journal of Education. 1(30)13-26.

2010      Teaching-learning and curriculum development for human rights education: two sides of the same coin (co authors P du Preez & S Simmonds) Educational Research

 

Petro du Preez (NWU):

2009      Thinking about knowledge amidst religious diversity. Epistemic relativity and its impact on religion in education. Alternation, Special Edition (3): 91-111.

 

Annamagriet de Wet (NWU):

2010 The nature of learner sexual harassment in schools: An education law perspective. (co-author IJ Oosthuizen) Acta Academica.

 

Janet Jarvis (UKZN):

2009 The Voice of the Religion Education Teacher in the context of Religious Diversity. Alternation (3)138-156.

2009 Teacher Identity in a context of Religious Diversity. Alternation (3)157-176.

 

Hyacinth Skervin (NWU)

2010 Cultural Sites of Meaning: Challenges and Pitfalls for Gender-Based Research. Education Inquiry. Volume 4 December 2010

2010 Dialogic Analysis of Narrative Results from a Gender Study. Howard Journal of Communication Studies

 

Shan Simmonds (NWU):

2010      Divergent value systems meet convergent human rights moral dilemmas: implications for religion education (co-author CD Roux) British Journal of Religious Education [International Accredited Journal]

2010      Understanding how we understand girls’ voices on cultural and religious practices: curriculum spaces for justice. (co-author P du Preez) South African Journal of Education (Special Edition: Education for Social Justice) Accepted

2010      Views of boys and girls on cultural and religious practices for girls: A Gendered Human Rights Education response. (co-authors CD Roux, I ter Avest and A de Wet). Gender and Education (submitted)

 

Papers at the International Conference on Human Rights Education: Challenges and Proposals

April 2011

  • Becker, A: Identity premised on equality of difference as a fundamental human right
  • De Wet, A. Gender violence in schools: suggestions for creating friendlier environments for girls
  • Du Preez, P. A conceptual framework for evaluating human rights in the curriculum in diverse contexts
  • Du Preez, P. How democratic is human rights? – Human rights in diverse education settings
  • Galloway, G. Transcending narratives: Narrative inquiry as a means to communicative action
  • Jarvis, J. Teachers’ religious and cultural identities and gender equality
  • Mannah, S. The disconnect between Human Rights and Ubuntu in selected school communities
  • Simmonds, S. Understanding human rights in diverse education contexts from different gender perspectives
  • Skervin, H. Doing Context Research for Human Rights Education in a Diverse South Africa
  • Roux, CD Human Rights in Education: Who is responsible?
  • Ter Avest, Ina. Equity of girls and boys in citizenship education: similar, parallel, equal, comparable, identical or (inter)related developmental processes?
  • Van de Brink, Sabine and Ter Avest, Ina. Human Rights Education from a teacher perspective: A classroom interaction case study

 

Summary

The main aim of this project is to determine, through a rhizomatic research paradigm and grounded theory using mixed research methodologies, the knowledge construct of human rights literacy in human rights education. Five determinants have been identified as the starting points for this research paradigm and project. These determinants [(i)gender issues; (ii)human rights values (iii)social justice; (iv)socio-cultural contexts and (v)curriculum development and implementations] will be a unique combination and might integrate the fundamentals human rights issues in construing the knowledge development of human rights literacy.

 

Co investigator(s):

Prof Lebo Moletsane (UKZN)

Prof Andre Keet (UFS)

Dr Petro du Preez (NWU)

Dr Thobeka Mda (HSRC)

 

Junior researchers:

Ms Shan Simmonds (NWU)

Ms Cecile Eloff (NWU)

The process of the research might involve other researchers during research activities as the research paradigm allows new interventions and explorations in the specific research domain.

 

Ethics

All South African Faculties of Education taking part in the survey will be contacted in advance with the required ethical clearance (from the NWU-Potchefstroom Campus) on this project. The ethical clause on involvement of all participants will be honoured. Permission will be asked from relevant individuals according to the guidelines of the NWU-ethical research committee. The researchers in the project will inform their Faculties of Education of their involvement in the project.

Data Management and Utilisation

The survey data will be gathered electronically and will involve all fourth year education students at the Faculties of Education as indicated above. It will be stored in its original form for 5-7 years at the Faculty of Education Sciences (NWU) as the key responsible data-collector in this project. The qualitative records and data will be stored in its original collected form of gathered (recorded data and questionnaires). The required data will be analysed by the statistical consultants of the NWU (accredited) and the researchers allocated to this project. This consultations and data management will utilised for research purposes only and pseudo names will be used when any data are disseminated in academic publications. All data obtained will only be utilised in academic publication and post-graduate studies.

 

Student support

Two doctoral students (Part time) = (R24 000.00) per annum

Three fulltime Masters students = (R120 000.00) per annum

One postdoctoral (R80 000.00) per annum for two years = (R160 000.00)

 

References

Almqvist, J. 2005. Human Rights Culture and the Rule of Law Cornwall: Oxford Hart Publishing.

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De Tavarnier, J., & Pollefyet, D. 1998. Heeft de traditie van de Mensenrechten toekoms? Leuven: Uitgeverij Acco.

De Wet, A. 2008. Research on sexual harassment of girls in secondary schools in SA. Report for UNESCO; North West University (Potchefstroom campus)

Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattari (1983) On The Line. Trans.  by John Johnston. New York: Semiotext(e)

Deleuze, Gilles and Felix Guattari (1987) A Thousand Plateaus. Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Trans. By Brain Massumi. Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press.

Donnelly, J. 2003. Universal human rights in theory and practice. 2nd ed. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Du Preez, P. 2008. Dialogue as facilitation strategy: Infusing the classroom with a culture of Human Rights. Unpublished PhD-Dissertation, Department of Curriculum Studies, Faculty of Education, University of Stellenbosch.

English, K. & Stapleton, A. 1997. Human rights handbook: a practical guide to monitoring human rights. Durban: Juta. 298 p.

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Gearon, L. 2002. Human Rights and Religion. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press.

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Roux, C.D. 2009. Human Rights Education in Diversity: Empowering girls in rural and metropolitan environments (2010-2013). Research proposal submitted and proved by internal funders, South Africa Netherlands Research Programmes on Alternatives in Development (SANPAD).

Roux, C.D. 2010. Religious literacy and human rights literacy as prerequisite for human rights education. In G. Durka, L. Gearon, M. de Souza & K. Engelbretson (eds.) International Handbook for Inter-religious Education (Volume 4). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Roux, C.D., Smith, J., Ferguson, R., du Preez, P., Small, R. & Jarvis, J. 2009. Understanding human rights through different belief systems: intercultural and interreligious dialogue. Research report: South African Netherlands Project on Alternative Developments (SANPAD) 150pp).

Runzo, J., Martin, N. & Sharma, A. (eds.) 2007. Human Rights and Responsibilities in World Religions. Oxford Oneworld Publications.

Simmonds, S.R. 2010. Primary school learners understanding of human rights teaching-learning in classroom practice. MEd-Dissertation: North-West University (Potchefstroom-Campus), South Africa.

Tibbitts, C. 2002. Understanding what we do: emerging models for human rights education. International review of education, 48(3-4):159-171.

 

 

 

 

 

Applicant:

Prof CD Roux: Project leader HREiD

(April 2012)

[1]This project was funded by the NRF (2012-2015). The project leader Prof CD Roux was then appointed as a research professor/research director (2008-2015) in the Faculty of Education Sciences, NWU (Potchefstroom campus). Since April 2016 she has been appointed as an extraordinary professor at the Faculty of Education, Stellenbosch University.

[2] Since September 2016 the website http://www.hrlit.org/ hosts all the information and research of HREiD.co.za and http://www.nwu.ac.za/HREiD.